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The Cricket on the Hearth. Charles Dickens

Nor was it less agreeable to observe how John the Carrier, reference being made by Dot to the aforesaid baby, checked his hand when on the point of touching the infant, as if he thought he might crack it; and bending down, surveyed it from a safe distance, with a kind of puzzled pride, such as an amiable mastiff might be supposed to show, if he found himself, one day, the father of a young canary.

′An′t he beautiful, John? Don′t he look precious in his sleep?′

′Very precious,′ said John. ′Very much so. He generally IS asleep, an′t he?′

′Lor, John! Good gracious no!′

′Oh,′ said John, pondering. ′I thought his eyes was generally shut. Halloa!′

′Goodness, John, how you startle one!′

′It an′t right for him to turn ′em up in that way!′ said the astonished Carrier, ′is it? See how he′s winking with both of ′em at once! And look at his mouth! Why he′s gasping like a gold and silver fish!′

′You don′t deserve to be a father, you don′t,′ said Dot, with all the dignity of an experienced matron. ′But how should you know what little complaints children are troubled with, John! You wouldn′t so much as know their names, you stupid fellow.′ And when she had turned the baby over on her left arm, and had slapped its back as a restorative, she pinched her husband′s ear, laughing.

′No,′ said John, pulling off his outer coat. ′It′s very true, Dot. I don′t know much about it. I only know that I′ve been fighting pretty stiffly with the wind to-night. It′s been blowing north- east, straight into the cart, the whole way home.′

′Poor old man, so it has!′ cried Mrs. Peerybingle, instantly becoming very active. ′Here! Take the precious darling, Tilly, while I make myself of some use. Bless it, I could smother it with kissing it, I could! Hie then, good dog! Hie, Boxer, boy! Only let me make the tea first, John; and then I′ll help you with the parcels, like a busy bee. "How doth the little"—and all the rest of it, you know, John. Did you ever learn "how doth the little," when you went to school, John?′

′Not to quite know it,′ John returned. ′I was very near it once. But I should only have spoilt it, I dare say.′

′Ha ha,′ laughed Dot. She had the blithest little laugh you ever heard. ′What a dear old darling of a dunce you are, John, to be sure!′

Not at all disputing this position, John went out to see that the boy with the lantern, which had been dancing to and fro before the door and window, like a Will of the Wisp, took due care of the horse; who was fatter than you would quite believe, if I gave you his measure, and so old that his birthday was lost in the mists of antiquity. Boxer, feeling that his attentions were due to the family in general, and must be impartially distributed, dashed in and out with bewildering inconstancy; now, describing a circle of short barks round the horse, where he was being rubbed down at the stable-door; now feigning to make savage rushes at his mistress, and facetiously bringing himself to sudden stops; now, eliciting a shriek from Tilly Slowboy, in the low nursing-chair near the fire, by the unexpected application of his moist nose to her countenance; now, exhibiting an obtrusive interest in the baby; now, going round and round upon the hearth, and lying down as if he had established himself for the night; now, getting up again, and taking that nothing of a fag-end of a tail of his, out into the weather, as if he had just remembered an appointment, and was off, at a round trot, to keep it.

′There! There′s the teapot, ready on the hob!′ said Dot; as briskly busy as a child at play at keeping house.

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