HomeJean de La FontaineTHE PEACOCK COMPLAINING TO JUNO

THE PEACOCK COMPLAINING TO JUNO. Jean de La Fontaine

The Peacock to great Juno came:
"Goddess," he said, "they justly blame
The song you′ve given to your bird:
All nature thinks it most absurd,
The while the Nightingale, a paltry thing,
Is the chief glory of the spring:
Her note so sweet, and deep, and strong."
"I do thee, jealous bird, no wrong,"
Juno, in anger, cried:
"Restrain thy foolish pride.
Is it for you to envy other′s song?—
You who around your neck art wearing
Of rainbow silks a hundred different dyes?—
You, who can still display to mortal′s eyes
A plume that far outfaces
A lapidary′s jewel-cases?
Is there a bird beneath the skies
More fit to please and strike?
No animal has every gift alike:
We′ve given you each one his special dower;
This one has beauty, and that other power.
Falcons are swift; the Eagle′s proud and bold;
By Ravens sorrow is foretold;
The Crow announces miseries to come;
All are content if singing or if dumb.
Cease, then, to murmur, lest, as punishment,
The plumage from thy foolish back be rent."

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