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David Copperfield. Charles Dickens

The Captain never lost dignity, from having his ears boxed with the Latin Grammar. I did; but the Captain was a Captain and a hero, in despite of all the grammars of all the languages in the world, dead or alive.

This was my only and my constant comfort. When I think of it, the picture always rises in my mind, of a summer evening, the boys at play in the churchyard, and I sitting on my bed, reading as if for life. Every barn in the neighbourhood, every stone in the church, and every foot of the churchyard, had some association of its own, in my mind, connected with these books, and stood for some locality made famous in them. I have seen Tom Pipes go climbing up the church-steeple; I have watched Strap, with the knapsack on his back, stopping to rest himself upon the wicket-gate; and I know that Commodore Trunnion held that club with Mr. Pickle, in the parlour of our little village alehouse.

The reader now understands, as well as I do, what I was when I came to that point of my youthful history to which I am now coming again.

One morning when I went into the parlour with my books, I found my mother looking anxious, Miss Murdstone looking firm, and Mr. Murdstone binding something round the bottom of a cane - a lithe and limber cane, which he left off binding when I came in, and poised and switched in the air.

′I tell you, Clara,′ said Mr. Murdstone, ′I have been often flogged myself.′

′To be sure; of course,′ said Miss Murdstone.

′Certainly, my dear Jane,′ faltered my mother, meekly. ′But - but do you think it did Edward good?′

′Do you think it did Edward harm, Clara?′ asked Mr. Murdstone, gravely.

′That′s the point,′ said his sister.

To this my mother returned, ′Certainly, my dear Jane,′ and said no more.

I felt apprehensive that I was personally interested in this dialogue, and sought Mr. Murdstone′s eye as it lighted on mine.

′Now, David,′ he said - and I saw that cast again as he said it - ′you must be far more careful today than usual.′ He gave the cane another poise, and another switch; and having finished his preparation of it, laid it down beside him, with an impressive look, and took up his book.

This was a good freshener to my presence of mind, as a beginning. I felt the words of my lessons slipping off, not one by one, or line by line, but by the entire page; I tried to lay hold of them; but they seemed, if I may so express it, to have put skates on, and to skim away from me with a smoothness there was no checking.

We began badly, and went on worse. I had come in with an idea of distinguishing myself rather, conceiving that I was very well prepared; but it turned out to be quite a mistake. Book after book was added to the heap of failures, Miss Murdstone being firmly watchful of us all the time. And when we came at last to the five thousand cheeses (canes he made it that day, I remember), my mother burst out crying.

′Clara!′ said Miss Murdstone, in her warning voice.

′I am not quite well, my dear Jane, I think,′ said my mother.

I saw him wink, solemnly, at his sister, as he rose and said, taking up the cane:

′Why, Jane, we can hardly expect Clara to bear, with perfect firmness, the worry and torment that David has occasioned her today. That would be stoical. Clara is greatly strengthened and improved, but we can hardly expect so much from her. David, you and I will go upstairs, boy.

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